Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Naku, Nakuu, Nakuuu illustrations in the making Part 2





I just finished all the thumbnail sketches and the actual drawing of the illustrations. Here are some of my thoughts while doing the pencil sketches.

Illustrating children's books seem easy to do but it's actually very difficult to merge everything together: there should be lots of room for the text, the composition has to be very dynamic with one central focus of the action within the page.

Revise, revise, revise. Look again and again for details. As much as possible have it critiqued by well versed in the field, listen to what they have to say. If gone tired of looking, put it down then start again, then you will realize your mistakes.

Patterns within the page creates visual rhythm, these can be achieved by repeating some objects, patterns in the design of clothes, style of hands and feet, color, shapes and lines may also create the effect.

Sometimes exaggeration of some action creates dramatic composition. This can be done by enlarging or prolonging some of the character's body parts; extending movement within the space; extending the story out of context but without much fading away from the main action; and showing humor in the character's reactions.

Preferably, it is better to break social and design stereotypes: characters of different races, unusual but understandable settings and details, actions of characters that seem to display their unique habits or personalities as imperfect but civilized human beings.

Children's book illustration can also be a good avenue for inculcating positive values visually: playing with texts of positive quotes used as labels and names, drawing gestures and scenes that suggest or symbolizes proper behavior or other ways of showing affection/values. It's like embedding these positive values subliminally.


No comments: